What Cancellations? I didn’t even get a ride!

There are a lot of drivers on the various facebook group discussing the automatic emails Uber has been sending out. The emails warn about having too many cancellations, admonish drivers for cancelling “if you can’t accept the ride please go offline” and threaten deactivation.  The problem is  . . .  many times it wasn’t the driver’s fault! They weren’t the one to blame:

Scenario 1:  Driver gets ping, accepts ping, goes to destination and rider is a no show.  Uber’s response, “You seem to be cancelling more rides than other partners in your area.”

Scenario 2:  Driver gets a ping, rider cancels while driver en route (or even as driver is arriving). Uber’s response, “You seem to be cancelling more rides than other partners in your area.”

Scenario 3: Driver already has pax in car, another ride comes in and driver doesn’t accept (because they are on a multi-stop ride or any other reason). Uber’s response, “You seem to be accepting less rides than other partners in your area.”

And if those aren’t bad enough:

Scenario 4: Driver turns on app, immediately after app loads and is online driver receives a message that the rider has cancelled (driver never got a ping). Uber’s response, “You seem to be cancelling more rides than other partners in your area.”

If all of this has you shaking your head, Nolan G, a driver in the KC Metro area attempts to explain:

You are an independent contractor businesses person making decisions to maximize benefits to you and your clients.

You are Uber’s client, having hired them to help you connect with prospective clients.

You are an independent contractor businesses person making decisions to maximize benefits to you and your clients.

You pay Uber 20% to 28% of your gross fare to handle your payment processing, link you with clients, and arrange top-shelf commercial insurance.

You are an independent contractor businesses person making decisions to maximize benefits to you and your clients.

Uber, who works for you and us your hiree, sets and controls the rates you may charge for your services. You are free to charge less.

You are an independent contractor businesses person making decisions to maximize benefits to you and your clients.

Uber dissuades your clients from tipping you for excellent service.

You are an independent contractor businesses person making decisions to maximize benefits to you and your clients.

You choose when to work, what requests to accept, and when to cancel.

You are an independent contractor businesses person making decisions to maximize benefits to you and your clients.

Uber, who you pay and works for you can alter and manipulate any of the above and deactivate you at any time with or without cause.

You are an independent contractor businesses person making decisions to maximize benefits to you and your clients.

There. That should do it. 🙂

And if you’re still confused, join the masses.  Since the end of the year is coming we all know it’s only a matter of time and the annual “Winter Warm Up” cut-your-rate sale is just around the corner.  Hang on to your hats!

Although . . .drivers in the UK just won a lawsuit giving them minimum wage & vacation time when working for Uber  so maybe there is hope (pinch me now, I must be dreaming).

About uberg1rl 68 Articles
I've driven for Uber since October 2015, full and part-time. I started helping local drivers with tips and info. I have served as an Ambassador for UZURV, and now I'm an Ambassador for Lyft as well. I also help lead the local rideshare group.

1 Comment

  1. I don’t cancel rides very often but of thing I get alot of, is a ping coming thru, I press it to accept and it doesn’t go thru til the ping goes away, then I get dinged for canceling!
    Super frustrating, lately, when I message them about an issue, it takes a few days to her back to me.

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